RTU: Q&A “Don’t make me think – just tell me what to do!?”

“Don’t make me think, I just want to move. Can’t you tell me what to do?”

I get it – we live in an overstimulating, in-our-heads kind of world.

I’ve had private clients begin a session saying “Don’t make me think or make decisions, just tell me what to do.”

We may begin there as I guide them through a movement flow, warm up or meditation, yet I know when our awareness is switched on and we’re present, the results are astounding.

For better or worse – You’re in charge of your own experience. 

From the overload of daily life, technology, worry, and interpersonal dynamics, it can feel soothing to surrender to someone else’s power or guidance.

Even if you did want 24/7 private coaching (and felt compelled to pay the large investment attached to that level of support) – I wouldn’t offer it. The one person we spend the most time with is ourselves. I teach people to be their own best advocate, running coach and friend.

If we can improve that which we do most often – how we think, how we breathe, how we move – that will make the biggest impact on our own lives.

I invite you now actively engage with your experience.

You can learn how to focus your attention and relax.

But isn’t imagery just going to keep me in my head?” Or something I’ve heard from runners “I don’t want to think, I just want to run. I run to stop thinking!”

Runner’s Tune Up might not be for you if you’re content with your current level of fitness, you’re not looking for a change, or you’re just not willing to try something new. And that’s great if it’s true for you. Kudos to self awareness.

But if you’re here reading this post, you’re probably seeking support or new training solutions, right?

While imagery does require conscious attention, many runners have reported that they feel more focused and calmer by using imagery strategies.

Imagery gives you tools for the road that can quickly clear your mind of the day’s conflicts and to-do items.

Imagery isn’t ‘thinking about more stuff’.

Imagery helps us have a new experience.

It’s about creating a useful change, feeling our own performance. Being present so we can coach ourselves effectively.

How can you tell the difference?

You feel it. Your recovery and training improve. You feel more at peace or clear when embodied.

Did you find this article helpful? Share it, and tell us in the comments!

See you in the comments,

Cheri

PS: If you’re curious about experiencing these results and feel ready to make a change, check out the 6-week online program, Runner’s Tune Up. We give you lots of imagery strategies (and teach your how to use them) to help clear your mind, feel more enjoyment, and improve your physical performance and efficiency.

PPS: Read more here about negative self talk and how imagery practice changes thought patterns.

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